Baselworld 2014 sneak preview: Rado HyperChrome Automatic Chronograph in Plasma High-Tech Ceramic

Rado HyperChrome Automatic Chronograph in Plasma High-Tech Ceramic

The case and bracelet may look like metal, but there is no metal involved at all. It´s plasma high-tech ceramic, the material is innovative and this is what Rado stands for.

Rado took a piece of white ceramic and transformed it “magically” into a gleaming watchcase that looks like metal. No metal was used; Rado instead used a modern and advanced materials technology. The monobloc case, injected at high-pressure, is a groundbreaking construction. As a single piece of ceramic, it contains no steel cage as many ceramic timepieces do. This makes it lightweight as well as super scratch-resistant and comfortable to wear. The final monobloc piece then goes into a special oven, where a plasma column activates gases at 20.000°C. These gases permeate the ceramic, permanently altering the composition of its surface and bringing out a brilliant metallic sheen that will never fade.

The new Rado HyperChrome Automatic Chronograph Plasma Ceramic is another product to sum up Rado´s DNA.

This form of modern alchemy, where gases activated at high temperature change the molecular composition of the ceramic, now features on the newest Rado families. Scintillatingly scientific and super stylish, plasma high-tech ceramic has a brilliant metallic shine in a warm grey tone, without using any metal.

In my eyes that’s a perfect combination of technology, style and luxury…

The Rado HyperChrome Automatic Chronograph Plasma Ceramic is powered by an ETA 2894-2 automatic chronograph calibre. The case size´s are: 41,8 x 51 x 13 mm.

Rado HyperChrome Automatic Chronograph in Plasma High-Tech Ceramic
Rado HyperChrome Automatic Chronograph in Plasma High-Tech Ceramic
Rado HyperChrome Automatic Chronograph in Plasma High-Tech Ceramic
Rado HyperChrome Automatic Chronograph in Plasma High-Tech Ceramic
Rado HyperChrome Automatic Chronograph in Plasma High-Tech Ceramic
Rado HyperChrome Automatic Chronograph in Plasma High-Tech Ceramic
Rado HyperChrome Automatic Chronograph in Plasma High-Tech Ceramic
Rado HyperChrome Automatic Chronograph in Plasma High-Tech Ceramic

 

 

 

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7 Comments

  • Dear Alexander, the Rado HyperChrome was an interesting article showing more interesting & innovative materials being incorporated into the watch industry. My question is a bit more basic concerning the movement: the ETA 2894-2.The most recent Watch Time (Feb. 2014)contained an article on chronograph calibers. I’m familiar with the majority of the material Mike Disher covered; unfortunately, he omitted to mention the ETA 2894. I know that the 2894 is a modular movement; but since he didn’t cover the movement at all, can you tell me if the functioning of the ETA chrono.2894 is employed with a column wheel, or cam switching as with the Valjoux 7750? Thank you, Charles Rizzuto

  • It sure could have fooled me. The bracelet looks like metal and it is not metal though. Why does it say “stainless steel” on the back of the case though , maybe that refers to the movement ? I used to like the colour silver but lately I am partial to the colour black for the face of the watch. By the way , spell check might think that I misspelled the word “colour” but I didn’t, that is how we spell it in Canada, eh , lol

  • Very interesting and again, I just have to realize once more: There is a LOT of innovation going on in Swatch Group – simply fantastic.

  • Would love to see how the surfaces look under normal lighting. If the watch looks as wonderful as they look here, the materials engineering achievement here is even more impressive than the Dark Side of the Moon from its sister company.

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