Habring² presents Felix + jumping second = Erwin

Habring² ERWIN powered by Calibre A11S.
Habring² ERWIN powered by Calibre A11S.

My fellow Austrian friends Maria and Richard Habring (that´s why the brand is named Habring²) have another Made-in-Austria-timepiece in their portfolio. It is called Erwin. Click on “read more” to see and discover Erwin …

 

In August 2014 I presented you Felix, the first wristwatch powered by a Habring2 in-house calibre. Here underneath is a link to my story …

 

https://watch-insider.com/news/10-years-habring2-maria-and-richard-habring-celebrate-their-first-decade-with-felix/

 

Now, two years later Maria and Richard Habring present their newest “baby” called Erwin.

Erwin is Felix plus a jumping second. 

Thanks to its clever design the Calibre A11 not only enabled the replacement of previous calibres but also a number of new developments. The modular addition of the jumping second – already in 2007 Habring² was the first manufacturer to present such a new design – turns the Calibre A11B (Basis) into the Calibre A11S (jumping second). Now Felix has a twin brother named Erwin. Both calibres fit in the same slim 38.5 mm case. Calibre A11S with the jumping second is still a slim 5.7 mm and therefore its 9 mm case still fits comfortably beneath even snug-fitting sleeve cuffs.

Erwin‘s case is 100% Made in Austria – as are those of every member of the Habring² family. The raw material is tempered in the smelter of world famous steel specialist Böhler of Kapfenberg and then processed by metalworking experts.

Many more components are Made in Austria and the entire brain power and manual work are Made in Austria. So Maria and Richard can proudly say their Erwin is Made in Austria. As far as I know this is the only watch, that really can claim this.

 

Habring² ERWIN powered by Calibre A11S.
Habring² ERWIN powered by Calibre A11S.

 

Habring² FELIX and ERWIN powered by Calibres A11B and A11S.
Habring² FELIX and ERWIN powered by Calibres A11B and A11S.

 

 

Habring² A11S movement powering Erwin:

  • Diameter: 30 mm; height: 5.7 mm
  • Centre-mounted hour hand, minute hand and jumping second hand
  • 28,800 half oscillations per hour (4Hz)
  • Hand-wound movement with 48 hours of power reserve
  • Fine adjustment via tangential screw
  • Amagnetic escapement with a Carl Haas balance spring in chronometer quality
  • KIF shockproof pursuant to DIN and NIHS
  • 21 rubies
  • Elaborately refined by hand with polished edges, decorative grinding, perlage, etc.
  • 65 service-relevant individual parts (126 parts in total)

 Case:

  • Stainless steel, three-part, 38.5 mm in diameter, 9.0 mm in height
  • Watertight to the depth equivalent of 30 metres
  • Spherical sapphire lens
  • Double-sealed crown, sapphire base
  • Consecutive serial number engraved between the lugs at 6 o’clock

Dial/hands:

  • Silver-white granular metal dial with black print or silver-white calendered metal dial with red gold plated hour bars/digits and black print
  • Polished, black oxidised steel hands in thread form or polished red gold plated hands

 

Felix and Erwin have also received a new silver dial with a discreet brushed metal finish and completely smooth, red gold plated hour bars and digits is made using the covering technique applied to classic examples from the 1950s. The matching red gold plated hands lend the two twins even more distinguished noblesse – especially in comparison to the more reserved dial/hand variants that remain available.

Erwin is available with both dial variants at a price of 5,450 Euro including 20 % VAT. Felix remains the Habring² entry level model at a price of  4,450 Euro including 20 % VAT also for the new dial.

 

 

Habring² FELIX powered by Calibre A11B
Habring² FELIX powered by Calibre A11B

 

 

 

 

 

 

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One reply on “Habring² presents Felix + jumping second = Erwin”
  1. says: Martin

    Excuse my ignorance but what is a ‘jumping’ second hand. Is it similar to the movement of the second hand on a quartz watch? If so, I like the idea but not sure how it will go down with those that look upon the smooth movement to distinguish between electro-mechanical and the purely mechanical watches they love?

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