Vacheron Constantin Overseas Quantième Simple and Overseas Dual Time with a navy blue dial – Blue is the new black

Vacheron Constantin Overseas Dual Time

The Overseas watches are the rather inconspicuous ones within the Vacheron Constantin collections. This is entirely unjust in my eyes! Have a look at these two …

 

I know that Vacheron Constantin is working on the relaunch of its Overseas collection. Maybe we are going to see new models next year in January at the SIHH in Geneva. Whatever the designers plan to do, they rather not reinvent the legendary Overseas. I recommend them to refine its look and to present a whole new range of attractive models.

Together with the Royal Oak from Audemars Piguet, the Marine from Breguet, the Diagono from Bulgari, the Nautilus from Patek Philippe and the Polo from Piaget these are the ticking Range Rovers of the industry. Noble and robust watches that simply differ from the other ticking SUVs…

 

This is the new 300 pieces limited Vacheron Constantin Overseas Dual Time, indicating hours, minutes, seconds, date by separate hand, second zonetime with day/night indication and the power reserve

 

Vacheron Constantin Overseas Dual Time
Vacheron Constantin Overseas Dual Time

 

The watch is powered by calibre 1222 SC, a mechanical, self-winding movement; its 42 mm, 150 meters waterproof steel case features a soft-iron inner case offering an anti-magnetic protection; 26.6 mm (11’’’ ¼) diameter; 4.85 mm thick; approximately 40 hours of power reserve; 4 Hz (28,800 A/h); 153 components; 34 jewels

 

 

This is the new 350 pieces limited Vacheron Constantin Overseas Quantième Simple, indicating hours, minutes, seconds and the date

 

Vacheron Constantin Overseas Quantième Simple
Vacheron Constantin Overseas Quantième Simple

 

The watch is powered by calibre 1226, a mechanical, self-winding movement; its 42 mm, 150 meters waterproof steel case features a soft-iron inner case offering an anti-magnetic protection; 26.6 mm (11’’’ ¼) diameter; 3.25 mm thick; approximately 40 hours of power reserve; 4 Hz (28,800 A/h); 143 components; 36 jewels

 

Both watches are delivered with a blue rubber and a blue Mississippiensis alligator leather strap, hand-stitched, with large square scales, a stainless steel clasp and a triple blade folding clasp, double security with buttons

 

 

 

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8 Comments

  • I am a fan of the Overseas and would prefer it over an AP RO.

    However, with the dual times, I find the power reserve too dominant for my taste. Don’t know why but next to size it is also that the radius does not find its fitting on the rest of the dial.

    Maybe something for the design refresh?

    Anyway, the chronograph with centred big date is a favourite. This blue if the dial, too.

    Regards, Kolosstt

  • Dear Alexander, i agree about the VC overseas. In the high end watch market Patek, Audermars and Vacheron have some iconic models and it is a real shame for the brand as well as for the watch collectors to see a great model like that to disapear. Love the blue colour.

  • I agree, these are both great movements. I was only objecting to the press kit. I believe you and I think the same way.

  • Interestingly, on the Timezone “Industry News” area, the official press kit said the Overseas Dual-time with caliber 1222 was “in-house.” Anyone who has been around for a while will know that this movement comes from JLC and is supplied to AP, VC, Piaget and VC&A, in this format, and in the Ralph Lauren in the JLC-normally exclusive version with the floating cities.
    The 3-hand version’s movement comes from Frederic-Piguet, if I’m not mistaken.
    Thank you for eliminating the “in-house” aspect from this post.
    -Dean

    • None of these is in-house! Who needs to know this knows it… 🙂 but still the calibres used are good and in line with the VC history. Today VC starts to use more and more in-house calibres

    • Funny, though, it seems the movements mentioned are top of the line. Vacheron used JLC movements since the 1940’s and produced some of the most beautifully finished movements in the industry. In fact, Vacheron and JLC were the same company, for a several years.But don’t think “in-house” is in someways, always better than out-sourced. Most of the movements provided by JLC to V&C during the 1950’s and 1960’s were chronometer grade and beautifully finished by V&C. JLC architecture on its movements then were in any way inferior to Patek’s or any other manufacturer. The Swiss have always outsourced for movements or parts to the movements Doing in-house on movements provides, perhaps, better quality control. In fact, hand work on the movements creates beautiful finishing which may provide a longer lasting movement and does not guarantee the most accurate timekeeping. Besides an ebauche does not a complete movement make.

    • The 3-hand version’s movement comes also from JLC’s movement 899.
      Yannis

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